Posted 3 weeks ago / 283 notes / Via: feuille-d-automne

thehystericalsociety:

Reflection on the water -   c. 1900 - (Via)

thehystericalsociety:

Reflection on the water -   c. 1900 - (Via)

Posted 3 weeks ago / 11,141 notes / Via: mirroir

(Source: viktors-opium)

Posted 4 weeks ago / 1,415 notes / Via: funeral-wreaths

nitratediva:

From A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935).

nitratediva:

From A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935).

Posted 4 weeks ago / 164 notes / Via: themediaevalist

geisterseher:

Karlsruhe : Badische Landesbibliothek, St. Peter pap. 32, f. 50r. Konrad Grünenberg, Beschreibung der Reise von Konstanz nach Jerusalem. Bodenseegebiet, [ca. 1487]

geisterseher:

Karlsruhe : Badische Landesbibliothek, St. Peter pap. 32, f. 50r. Konrad Grünenberg, Beschreibung der Reise von Konstanz nach Jerusalem. Bodenseegebiet, [ca. 1487]

(Source: blb-karlsruhe.de)

Posted 4 weeks ago / 271 notes / Via: bookporn


erikkwakkel:
Hungry medieval mouse
Some readers are omnivores in that they consume anything that is printed. This image illustrates that humans are not the only ones to do so. You are looking at a 10th-century manuscript containing classical works, the pages of which are clearly nibbled at by a mouse. Mice - those pests of medieval libraries - put their teeth into any kind of book, whether from parchment or paper, and no matter what the topic. Today, of course, they have little chance to do so, since medieval manuscripts are out of reach, placed in the safety of vaults. The bites seen here likely date back to medieval times. In a strange way they witness the poor conditions under which books were kept. It was common in monasteries, for example, to keep and study books in the courtyard. It does not take much to see a monk running after a mouse, wishing he could curse the darn creature.
Pic (my own): Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, VLO 92 (composite, with parts from the 10th and 11th centuries).

erikkwakkel:

Hungry medieval mouse

Some readers are omnivores in that they consume anything that is printed. This image illustrates that humans are not the only ones to do so. You are looking at a 10th-century manuscript containing classical works, the pages of which are clearly nibbled at by a mouse. Mice - those pests of medieval libraries - put their teeth into any kind of book, whether from parchment or paper, and no matter what the topic. Today, of course, they have little chance to do so, since medieval manuscripts are out of reach, placed in the safety of vaults. The bites seen here likely date back to medieval times. In a strange way they witness the poor conditions under which books were kept. It was common in monasteries, for example, to keep and study books in the courtyard. It does not take much to see a monk running after a mouse, wishing he could curse the darn creature.

Pic (my own): Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, VLO 92 (composite, with parts from the 10th and 11th centuries).

Posted 1 month ago / 208 notes / Via: funeral-wreaths

feuille-d-automne:

Expérience aérostatique effectuée par Ernest et Henri Roger. Brunoy, 1891.
© Ernest Roger / Roger-Viollet

feuille-d-automne:

Expérience aérostatique effectuée par Ernest et Henri Roger. Brunoy, 1891.

© Ernest Roger / Roger-Viollet

Posted 1 month ago / 1,560 notes / Via: ancient-serpent

saloandseverine:

 Catacomb Saints by Paul Koudounaris, Heavenly Bodies, 2013

saloandseverine:

 Catacomb Saints by Paul Koudounaris, Heavenly Bodies, 2013

Posted 1 month ago / 631 notes / Via: scientificillustration

thee-gold-bug:

John Edwards Holbrook / North American Herpetology / 1836-40

thee-gold-bug:

John Edwards Holbrook / North American Herpetology / 1836-40

Posted 1 month ago / 347,969 notes / Via: caulifloral


“This shot is the most expensive shot in silent film history. It was filmed in a single take, that had to be perfect, with a real train and a ‘dummy’ engineer (notice the white arm hanging out the conductors window). Some of the locals who came to watch the filming, thought the dummy was a real person and screamed in horror; supposedly, one person even fainted.”

“This shot is the most expensive shot in silent film history. It was filmed in a single take, that had to be perfect, with a real train and a ‘dummy’ engineer (notice the white arm hanging out the conductors window). Some of the locals who came to watch the filming, thought the dummy was a real person and screamed in horror; supposedly, one person even fainted.”

(Source: maudit)

Posted 1 month ago / 2,231 notes / Via: tentaclegarden

chimneyfish:

The Priestess of Delphi, 1891
John Collier

chimneyfish:

The Priestess of Delphi, 1891

John Collier

Posted 1 month ago / 9 notes / Via: fatoprofugus

jjordan7:

The Roman Forum by famigliaferraris

jjordan7:

The Roman Forum by famigliaferraris

Posted 1 month ago / 320 notes / Via: fee-verte

oursoulsaredamned:

Pan :: Mondo. (1819-1821)

oursoulsaredamned:

Pan :: Mondo. (1819-1821)

Posted 1 month ago / 66 notes / Via: feuille-d-automne

feuille-d-automne:

Bourse aux timbres. Paris, 1907.
© Jacques Boyer / Roger-Viollet

feuille-d-automne:

Bourse aux timbres. Paris, 1907.

© Jacques Boyer / Roger-Viollet


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swearonyourhatHello lost child ! This is the small collection of dreams and nightmares made by a french witch. For the rest, I hand over to your fantasy.



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