Posted 3 days ago / 665 notes / Via: ancient-serpent

ooblium:

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes — 1605

ooblium:

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes — 1605

Posted 3 days ago / 2,967 notes / Via: 13thmoon

(Source: cinnamontits)

Posted 3 days ago / 12 notes / Via: themediaevalist

lotjunn:

UNKNOWN WEAVER, English
The Bayeux Tapestry (detail)
c. 1080
Wool embroidered on a linen background
Musée de la Tapisserie de la Reine Mathilde, Bayeux

lotjunn:

UNKNOWN WEAVER, English

The Bayeux Tapestry (detail)

c. 1080

Wool embroidered on a linen background

Musée de la Tapisserie de la Reine Mathilde, Bayeux

Posted 3 days ago / 126 notes / Via: deathandmysticism

deathandmysticism:

François-Nicolas Chifflart, Cholera in Paris, 1865

deathandmysticism:

François-Nicolas Chifflart, Cholera in Paris, 1865

Posted 4 days ago / 1,100 notes / Via: ancient-serpent

ancient-serpent:

Partial Eclipse of the Sun book, 1851

ancient-serpent:

Partial Eclipse of the Sun book, 1851

Posted 4 days ago / 783 notes / Via: scientificillustration

nemfrog:

Fig. 22. The radiant point of the November meteors. 1890.

nemfrog:

Fig. 22. The radiant point of the November meteors. 1890.

Posted 4 days ago / 420 notes / Via: ghosts-in-the-library

ancient-serpent:

“The Lycanthropy (werewolf) research of Edward Harrell” by Alex CF.

ancient-serpent:

“The Lycanthropy (werewolf) research of Edward Harrell” by Alex CF.

Posted 4 days ago / 729 notes / Via: fuckyeahpaganism

fuckyeahgods:

Before Odin came along, there was Týr, a mighty warrior god. In the Viking Age people had all but forgotten about him, which is a shame, because there are some interesting tales surrounding this particular god. A good example is the binding of Fenrir. The result of a one night stand between Loki and a frost giantess, Fenrir was a savage wolf-creature that wreaked havoc wherever he went. The gods decided to use a magical cord to capture the beast for their own safety. Fenrir would only allow this if one of the gods put a hand in his mouth as a sign of good faith. Týr, being the brave and honorable warrior that he was, complied—and of course ended up with one of his hands bitten clean off when Fenrir realized the magical cord was so magical that he couldn’t break free. (via 10 Unknown Norse Gods And Goddesses - Listverse)

fuckyeahgods:

Before Odin came along, there was Týr, a mighty warrior god. In the Viking Age people had all but forgotten about him, which is a shame, because there are some interesting tales surrounding this particular god. A good example is the binding of Fenrir. The result of a one night stand between Loki and a frost giantess, Fenrir was a savage wolf-creature that wreaked havoc wherever he went. The gods decided to use a magical cord to capture the beast for their own safety. Fenrir would only allow this if one of the gods put a hand in his mouth as a sign of good faith. Týr, being the brave and honorable warrior that he was, complied—and of course ended up with one of his hands bitten clean off when Fenrir realized the magical cord was so magical that he couldn’t break free. (via 10 Unknown Norse Gods And Goddesses - Listverse)

Posted 4 days ago / 179 notes / Via: bookporn


petitcabinetdecuriosites:
The Biblioteca Malatestiana in Cesena, Italy The Biblioteca Malatestiana in Cesena, near Rimini in Northern Italy is without doubt the best-preserved example of what a late Medieval library looked like. Constructed in 1452 for Malatesta Novello, it was designed by the otherwise unknown architect Matteo Nutti. It still contains the books that Malatesta commissioned to be painstakingly copied out by hand. Each has been preserved in its original position, chained to the desks to prevent theft. In libraries such as this one, the readers went to the desk where the book was situated rather than requesting for the books to be brought to them. The brick vaults, covered in green painted plaster, were designed to resist fire.

petitcabinetdecuriosites:

The Biblioteca Malatestiana in Cesena, Italy

The Biblioteca Malatestiana in Cesena, near Rimini in Northern Italy is without doubt the best-preserved example of what a late Medieval library looked like. Constructed in 1452 for Malatesta Novello, it was designed by the otherwise unknown architect Matteo Nutti. It still contains the books that Malatesta commissioned to be painstakingly copied out by hand. Each has been preserved in its original position, chained to the desks to prevent theft. In libraries such as this one, the readers went to the desk where the book was situated rather than requesting for the books to be brought to them. The brick vaults, covered in green painted plaster, were designed to resist fire.

Posted 5 days ago / 483 notes / Via: scientificillustration

newberryprinting:

TGIF!

Best frontispiece ever? We think so. From A Glance at the Physical Sciences (1844).

Newberry call number: Wing ZP 883 .W6768

Posted 5 days ago / 125 notes / Via: ancient-serpent

design-is-fine:

Reproduction of the famous jewels of Monte Alban. A postcard, Marcel Breuer sent to his sister in Vienna, when he was in Mexico, 1975

design-is-fine:

Reproduction of the famous jewels of Monte Alban. A postcard, Marcel Breuer sent to his sister in Vienna, when he was in Mexico, 1975

(Source: breuer.syr.edu)

Posted 5 days ago / 1,231 notes / Via: funeral-wreaths


Glastonbury AbbeyFeathers Inn, Ludlow (Shropshire)1886Building Date 8th-14th century Europe: United Kingdom; Glastonbury

Glastonbury Abbey
Feathers Inn, Ludlow (Shropshire)
1886

Building Date 8th-14th century
Europe: United Kingdom; Glastonbury

(Source: gypsji)

Posted 5 days ago / 331 notes / Via: ancient-serpent

design-is-fine:

A girdle prayer book, as designed by John of Antwerp, 1540-45. The British Museum.

This was considered fashionable for ladies of rank in the English court of King Henry VIII between 1530-60. A small book enclosed within gold covers that is attached by long chains to girdle chains worn around the waist, almost as a conspicuous piece of jewellery. 
The fashion may have been introduced by the Spanish entourage of Queen Katherine of Aragon.

design-is-fine:

A girdle prayer book, as designed by John of Antwerp, 1540-45. The British Museum.

This was considered fashionable for ladies of rank in the English court of King Henry VIII between 1530-60. A small book enclosed within gold covers that is attached by long chains to girdle chains worn around the waist, almost as a conspicuous piece of jewellery.

The fashion may have been introduced by the Spanish entourage of Queen Katherine of Aragon.

(Source: britishmuseum.org)


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swearonyourhatHello lost child ! This is the small collection of dreams and nightmares made by a french witch. For the rest, I hand over to your fantasy.



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